[Webcast] Bridges and Blockades: Life at the DMZ

Wilson Center

Online

June 23, 2020, 3:00 pm EDT to 4:30 pm EDT

What is it like to work in Korea’s Demilitarized Zone (DMZ)? For decades, the United Nations Command Security Battalion (UNCSB) post in the Joint Security Area that divides Korea was a tense and volatile place referred to as “the world’s loneliest outpost.” Post-2018 diplomatic initiatives and newly-minted cooperation between UNCSB troops and their North Korean counterparts made the DMZ a far less forbidding border, yet recent months have brought renewed tensions to one of the world’s most-contested landscapes.

Lt . Col. Sean Morrow,  who served as the Commander of the UNCSB from 2018 until June of this year, has a unique perspective on the DMZ. As Morrow writes in an essay in the new issue of The Wilson Quarterly – “Bridges at Panmunjom” –  he played a key role in implementing diplomatic agreements to demilitarize the Joint Security Area over the past two years.

The Wilson Center will host a moderated discussion between Lt. Col. Morrow and longtime foreign correspondent Jean H. Lee, who as AP’s Pyongyang bureau chief made many trips to the DMZ from the North Korean side and now serves as director of the Wilson Center’s Korea Center. Also joining the discussion is Abraham Denmark, a former Deputy Assistant Secretary of Defense for East Asia who is now Director of the Wilson Center's Asia Program.

This event is being organized by the Hyundai Motor-Korea Foundation Center for Korean History and Public Policy and the Asia Program at the Woodrow Wilson Center to launch Korea: 70 Years On – the latest issue of The Wilson Quarterly.

Register here: https://engage.wilsoncenter.org/a/wilson-quarterly-summer-launch-bridges...

Speakers

Lt Colonel Sean Morrow, Commander, United Nations Command Security Battalion (UNCSB), 2018-2020

Abraham Denmark, Director, Asia Program, Wilson Center; former Deputy Assistant Secretary of Defense for East Asia

Jean H. Lee, Director, Hyundai Motor-Korea Foundation Center for Korean History and Public Policy, Wilson Center

View Original Invitation.